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In light of COVID-19, what kind of practices do you use to remain calm these days?

Please see this article https://www.micromentor.org/blog/dear-entrepreneur-how-are-you/ by COVID-19 Response mentor Eleftheria Egel, Ph.D.

What kind of practices do you use to remain calm these days? Do you the techniques described in this article resonate with you? Do you have others? Please let us know here!

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18 answers

Personal I have stayed calm with the amount of social media, streaming and video conference service out there so i can stay connected to family and friends

Report Ahmet's answer

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Very wise of you! I have tried to do the same (not 100% successful, though)! At least I was always aware when I "de-centered" and became reactive to negative news! Then I started a process of "re-centering" by removing fear from my emotions and "decluttering" unnecessary information from my brain.

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These are certainly troubling times that can make all of us anxious.

There are a few things that I have done to stay calm during this crisis. The first is to be grateful each day that no one in neither our family nor close friends has died from COVID-19. The ones that had the virus have survived. The next is trying to find positive things that have happened from being home for most of the time. Our family has grown closer and with our oldest daughter going to college in a year, we know that we will not get this amount of time together again. Also, volunteering my time has helped my mind stay positive. There are many benefits to volunteering. See this article https://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-living/volunteering-and-its-surprising-benefits.htm

Report Ken's answer

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Great topic! Similar to the above, taking some time to slow down and appreciate the small things. I've order a few books (non-business related!). I've tried out some on-line grocery delivery options and trying out new and unique dinners with the family. Stay safe all.

Report Tim's answer

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This unprecedented time has brought on several new challenges for most, including struggles with mental health. To increase “happy endorphins”, I try to be active for a minimum of 30 minutes each day. It could be a walk, a workout, or yoga, either way it is great for stress relief. I take breaks throughout the day to stretch, or practice breathing exercises which are both surprisingly helpful and calming. Sometimes when we are removed from things we are passionate about or that fulfill what we feel is our purpose, it can be depressing. My best advice is to never stop working on your personal and professional growth. Read often, even if you are not much of a reader like myself, find something that will keep your attention and you might be surprised. Leader Shift by John C. Maxwell was on of my favorites. There are so many opportunities to virtual volunteer right now, which will always make you feel a sense of purpose when giving back to others. Lastly, practice gratitude. Every night I write 10 things I am grateful for that happened during that day. It’s not only a moment of reflection, but also you will find yourself searching for more things to be grateful for each day to add to the nightly list, keeping you focused on positivity. As a result you also have several lists of things you are grateful for which can be a great resource when you’re feeling stuck in a rut. I hope that helps!

Report Jessica's answer

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Being grateful for our blessings is at the very top in the agenda of many friends and colleagues I talk to. It seems that gratefulness creates " happy endorphins" that allow us to see life positively. Appreciating the "small" daily things is the key to feeling grateful. And may be, this is what unites us all. We all have something in our life to be grateful for! Appreciating our life for what it is and not for what we would like it to be is probably one of those lessons we can learn in retrospect! In my case, it took me a long time to learn this lesson as I was caught in the rat wheel of achievement. Does anyone of you share the same experience?

Report Eleftheria's answer

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Very good responses! Additionally, I would like to add something that regulating the amount of time spent browsing new websites and social media is fundamental. Also keeping a daily journal has been a great helper in order to track and be conscious of my emotions over time.

Report Alejandro's answer

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Very interesting question indeed. After starting with helping in household tasks, helping my spouse and children, watching & researching news on the pandemic, I soon realized that I was getting affected adversely. I then switched to my hobby - painting. I forgot my surroundings and got deeply involved as I painted. I ended up creating some of my best creations in the bargain. I started physical workouts and walks, steadied myself and slowly started gaining my composure. I started focusing on others, rather than self and positive energy started flowing. Spending time in problem solving at micromentor has also helped me recoup.

Report Amitava's answer

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In our organization (and me personally), we've relied heavily on Ken Blanchard's PACT model. PACT stands for Perspective, Autonomy, Connectedness and Tone. Perspective is all about trying to keep focused on the big picture and seeing how everything going on fits into a longer term vision. Autonomy is about focusing on what you can control and taking action on those things. Connectedness is pretty straight forward, staying connected with those you have a healthy work/social/family relationship with. And lastly Tone is about maintaining your energy, whether that's physical, mental, emotional or spiritual well-being. By focusing on one thing in each of these areas each day, and for me personally, especially Perspective, it's helped me keep stress at manageable levels.

Report Cody's answer

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I bake handmade bread. At the beginning of the collective fear epidemic, when the number of real contact interactions decreased, I started growing a wheat yeast crop, followed by rye, oats and chickpea. Today I have healthy bread in my diet, and the national drink is kvass on honey.))

Report Igor's answer

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Mindfulness has been a way of life for me since adolescence. And I cannot overemphasize the benefits of just being present with your breath. This is obviously a condensed and concise answer; but it really is that simple.

Report Jose's answer

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Reading your responses is empowering! Each one carries its own wisdom and shows the diversity of human resourcefulness! Thank you for posting!

Report Eleftheria's answer

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First thing you need to know is that you are not competing with anyone. People tend to lose calm in times of emergency when they find themselves unproductive yet their peers keep sharing success stories about their work on social media. I would advise you set short objectives (daily or weekly) related to your work or personal life, and define activities you need to do to achieve those objectives. Also, identify fun activities, engage with friends on social media, participate in community discussions and voluntary work, and learn one new thing everyday.

Report Hassan's answer

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Elfrida Auston,

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Report Kenneth's answer

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Kenneth Larson, Thank you for your comment and the reminder! Despite the difficult times we are all going through, let's keep Micromentor community a space for open exchange of knowledge, tools, experience(s) and humane interaction

Report Eleftheria's answer

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Practise mindfulness Practicing yoga,pranayama

Report Gokul's answer

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As someone who works long hours the days off were appreciated, but as the days turned into weeks,weeks to months i began to panic.What if this really was the end of the world, wouldn't i see my family ever again? A friend pulled me out of this, then introduced me to a whole new hobby...work outs. It has energized /sane and kept me healthier since then. I do hope soon enough we can all be with our loved ones,hug them and tell them how much we missed their warmth, but till then let's stay safe.Cheers

Report Kate's answer

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